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Hellenic Institute for Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice

Hellenic Institute for Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in VeniceHellenic Institute for Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice

The Hellenic Institute for Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice was founded in 1951 as a Legal Person of Public Law, supervised and funded by the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Education. Supervision is carried out through two three-member Committees – the Supervisory and Administrative Committees – which are made up of representatives of the two co-competent Ministries. The Institute’s Director is responsible for its scientific work and general operation.

This scientific and research Institute publishes books by Greek and foreign academics, as well as a yearly academic journal, "Thesaurismata", in which research studies are published. The institute organizes academic conferences and lectures, and hosts researchers and scholars working on their doctoral theses.

With the aim of helping Greek academics to carry our research on the Post-Byzantine Period, every year the Institute awards six postgraduate scholarships of 1 to 3 years in duration. Scholarships include free housing and a monthly allowance.

The Hellenic Institute for Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice has significant assets – including real estate and moveable assets – that it received as a bequest from the Greek Confraternity in Venice. These assets include thirty-five pieces of real estate, some of which are architectural monuments of cultural significance, like the San Giorgio dei Greci church, the Institute’s Museum and the Flanghinis College.

The Institute has in its possession 300 icons – including three Palaiologans – 250 objects of worship, the Archive of Venetian Hellenism (1498-1953), as well as a collection of manuscripts. Exceptional examples of this collection are the “Romance of Alexander the Great”, with its 250 miniatures, the collection of Byzantine music manuscripts, and 16th century Patriarchal documents.

Last Updated Wednesday, 13 October 2010
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