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Home arrow Current Affairs arrow Top Story arrow Alternate Minister of Foreign Affairs Miltiadis Varvitsiotis participates in a meeting of the EU General Affairs Council (Brussels, 18 July 2019)

Alternate Minister of Foreign Affairs Miltiadis Varvitsiotis participates in a meeting of the EU General Affairs Council (Brussels, 18 July 2019)

Thursday, 18 July 2019

Alternate Minister of Foreign Affairs Miltiadis Varvitsiotis participates in a meeting of the EU General Affairs Council (Brussels, 18 July 2019)The Alternate Foreign Minister for European Affairs, Miltiadis Varvitsiotis, stressed the importance of funding for Greece through the new Multiannual Financial Framework at today’s meeting of the EU General Affairs Council. The discussion began in a positive climate, with Mr. Varvitsiotis welcoming Finland’s preparation on the issue.

With regard to the Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2021-2027, Mr. Varvitsiotis stressed the need for clarity as to what the new own funds will be in the framework.

On the implementation of the Strategic Agenda 2019-2024, Mr. Varvitsiotis noted the need for close monitoring of progress towards the Agenda’s individual goals if deepening of the Union is to be achieved.

On the margins of the Council, the Alternate Minister met with his colleague Amélie de Montchalin. Reaffirming the longstanding excellent relations between the two countries, they discussed the MFF and the potential for collaboration on the creation of own funds. The French Minister requested close cooperation with the Greek side. Finally, they had an in-depth discussion of the refugee issue and the increased migration flows, agreeing that this is a European problem that must be handled on the Community level.

Following the proceedings of the General Affairs Council, Mr. Varvitsiotis made the following statement:

“We discussed the new Multiannual Financial Framework for Europe; in other words, the money each country will receive from the European budget in the coming years. Greece will certainly come to these negotiations with a strong negotiating hand. First, the fact that its GDP has been reduced significantly due to the financial crisis, and second, the reform efforts it has made.

We will fight through to the end of these negotiations to ensure both our funding for farmers and our participation, with a significant percentage, in the Cohesion Fund, so that we can secure adequate funding to support the regeneration of the Greek economy.

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